Phone Zap! Ohio Hunger Strikers Maced for Protesting Retaliation

(IWOC) - David Easley, James Ward, and Matt Hinkston went on hunger strike on Friday, September 14. They are demanding an end to retaliation for involvement in the national strike, and protesting the long-term solitary confinement of inmates with mental health issues, and violence by guards. Prison officials are trying to put them in solitary and to put David in a sound-isolation chamber (a "bubble") in retaliation for this, and on Friday, September 14, guards in the Toledo Correctional Institution maced them for being on hunger strike and having a sit-in. This situation is still developing. It's really important for prison officials to know that we're watching, and that David, Jay, and Matt have public support for their human rights demands. Prisoners involved in the strikes have been put in solitary for months and years - Matt has been in limited privilege housing for 6 months and they're trying to extend his time in there, and David has been moved between a restricted unit and suicide watch over the last year. 


Reports From the 2018 Prisoner Strike

Rustbelt Abolition Radio Episode 21

(RAR) - As reports of the 2018 Prison Strike actions and state retaliation continue to come in, we speak with Amani Sawari –organizer and media contact with Jailhouse Lawyers Speak— about ways to support prison rebels. We also hear from J, who’s among the strikers inside a South Carolina Prison.


KS Prison Transfers Used to Silence Dissent

(IWOC) - In the late hours of Sunday, May 20th, Kansas Department of Corrections officials sent a special operations team, known in Kansas prisons as the "black suits," to the prison cell of Eric Sims, imprisoned in El Dorado Correctional Facility. They placed him in handcuffs and escorted him to a holding cell in another part of the institution, along with all his property. About an hour later, another special operations team arrived from Hutchinson Correctional Facility, removed Sims from the isolation cell, placed him in belly-chains and leg-irons, and then put him in a cage in the back of a van.


Phonezap for Wabash Valley Hunger Strikers in the SHU

MAKE THE LINES RING ALL DAY! FRIDAY, AUG 31, sunrise to sunset!

(IWOC) - Several inmates in the Secure Housing Unit (SHU) at Wabash Valley Correctional Facility are initiating a hunger strike in protest of their already starvation-level meal portions, their lack of access to basic necessities like adequate clothing, and access to commissary items . Food portions are extremely small, imagine a high school lunch tray where the section for your main course isn't even half full. The food they receive is already lacking in nutrition and comes in boxes labelled "not for human consumption." Food services in the IDOC are managed by the private corporation Aramark, and food served to inmates lacks basic nutritional value and is often served rotten. To make matters worse, Corrections Officers are known to contaminate food with saliva and feces.


Delivering A Devastating Blow to Human Slavery

Prison Strike 2018

Chattel slavery was supposedly terminated in 1865.  So why, in 2018, are human beings kept in cages and forced to work for pennies and “rented” and “traded” around the country? 

This is the reality of the prison labor force in America.  The American prison industry costs around $70 billion per year to sustain, and the vast majority of that cost is passed on to prisoners, their families and the American tax-payer.  However, there is an additional billion-dollar industry that is largely overlooked by the public:  prison labor for profit.  Detention centers negotiate lucrative contracts with industry to exploit prisoners as a labor source for pennies per hour, hardly a living wage.  Most of what they earn is quickly gobbled up by the company store model, “commissary” in which the basic necessities of life are sold.  A cup of ramen soup can cost 10 hours of hard labor in this model.  Meanwhile, corporations reap astronomical profits from both the labor and the contracts providing goods to the incarcerated.


How to Make Anti-Repression Phone Calls to a Prison

(IWOC) - Calls to prison is one of the quickest and most effective ways to put a prison on notice when they're abusing incarcerated rebels.

Consider joining or organizing a phone cluster with four or five others. This helps feel more connected to the action and helps build mutual accountability.


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